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  • Welcome to Gale Photography

    Hello, and welcome to my website! I'm Derek Gale, photography trainer and Fine Art photographer based in Worcester.

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Light, dark, and a touch of red

I’ve touched on patterns in previous posts.  They can be natural or can be man-made.  This post is about the man-made ones.

On a wander with a friend this week we passed some huge pylons carrying cables across the River Severn.  It was possible to get directly underneath them, and the focal length of my mobile’s camera, (35 mm equivalent), was just right to get the amount of perspective I wanted.  I cropped the image square and converted it to high contrast black and white.  That took away a bit of sky detail that was distracting.  Because I wasn’t absolutely under the centre it has a slightly disconcerting pattern.

The pylon image is mostly white with black lines; here’s the opposite in terms of tones.  The lock gates at Diglis Lock on the River Severn were just open, letting a slit of light through.  The slit and its reflection made an interesting transition. I used a 300mm equivalent lens to get the composition I wanted, and made sure the line was properly centered.  It was OK but worked better inverted.  Inverted the line and reflected line look like smoke from a chimney rather than water.

In these days of texting and email and suchlike it’s still gratifying to see a pile of letters ready to post.  Selecting just the very edges of the letters to be in focus gave a nice pattern repeat, and the red tint from the stamp reflections added an extra pattern.  I’d say it was a First Class image.  Did you see what I did there?

Keep your eyes open. Patterns on a large or a small scale, are everywhere.

 

Blimey, time flies!

I must apologise to my reader (readers?) for the huge gap between this blog post and my last blog post.  My only excuse is that the house move and associated stuff did take rather longer than expected.  Anyway, I’m here in Worcester now and photographically it’s looking very promising indeed.

“Red sky at night, photographer’s delight”?  Not all the time perhaps, but here behind the River Severn at Diglis it certainly was a fab sunset.  The fish rising added a bit of extra shape to the foreground, which was very handy.

Worcester has a lot of very interesting buildings, ranging from Medieval to brand spanking new.   This is the boathouse for the King’s School Boat Club.  It was opened in 2012 and is in the shape of a boat.  The shapes and contrast worked best in  black and white.

Finally a portrait.  There’s an elephant sculpture art trail on in Worcester at present.  It’s to raise money for a local hospice.  Each elephant has been painted by a different artist of group.  This one had a fabulously green face and the eye looks a bit scary!

So, a great start to my Worcester journey.  I’m looking forward to the future.

We’re in the process of selling our house and moving to Worcester.   Until that’s finally sorted I’ve removed my phone number from the website.

To get in touch please use the Contact Me page or email info(at)galephotography.co.uk

You’ll need to replace the (at) with the @ symbol. It’s a spam thing…

Looking forward to hearing from you.

How to make litter beautiful!

Whilst on a countryside walk recently I came across this huge pile of discarded shotgun cartridges on the edge of a wood.  There were thousands!  I wondered why the people who had assiduously gathered them up could not have then disposed of them in a responsible way.  Whilst the metal parts might rust away over time, the plastic parts will hang around for decades.

In an “out of the strong came something sweet” moment, I decided to try and make something beautiful out of the ugliness.  There was a good mixture of colours, so I set my Huawei Mate 10 Pro phone camera to “Silky Water” light painting mode.

I found a suitable section of cartridges and moved the phone in a smooth straight line.  The use of such an additive multi-exposure mode has reduced the cartridges to a composition of shapes and colours with a sense of movement along the frame.  I was pleased with how such an ugly thing had been altered by a simple technique.

Choosing a smaller section of cartridges I moved the phone in more of a curve/rotation.  I kept the phone still for part of the exposure to blend some sharpness with the blur.  If you look very hard you can see more of the individual cartridges, but they are hard to recognise unless you know what they are.  Again, the ugliness has turned to beauty.

I suppose the moral is that even the least promising subject, the result of other people’s selfishness, can be used to your photographic advantage.

Lockdown wanderings: Tracks and Traces #2.

The weather recently has not been conducive to getting one’s permitted daily exercise.  It’s been very cold, pretty windy and pretty wet.  Despite that I thought that popping up to the Ridgeway a few miles from my house would be a good idea.

The Ridgeway is an ancient trackway on the Marlborough Downs and it has various lumps and bumps visible near it.  Sometimes they are ancient burial mounds, and sometimes, like this one, they are just reservoirs.

It’s a grab shot.  I saw the person walking towards it, got out my TZ-100 compact and had time for one shot before they were not in a good place.  The B&W conversion makes it simpler and more timeless.  It rained hard soon after…

It had been raining on previous days and there were many puddles on the track.  It was so windy the puddles had ripples!  I dropped down and shot a detail of the ripples with my mobile.  I did a bit of post-processing to bump up the contrast.  It’s hard to tell the scale.  They could be big waves shot from a cliff.

It then started raining with a vengeance.  The wind made my brolly unusable, so I took shelter in a small copse.  There was a derelict building in the copse, and it would have been rude not to take a look inside.  I think it had been a pump house for a nearby reservoir.  Part of the roof was still present so it offered some extra shelter from the rain.  There was some graffiti on the wall and I was pleased to see that someone had provided an update to their relationship news.  That’s so rare to see.

A challenging day for exercise, but one with a few photographic surprises.