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  • Welcome to Gale Photography

    Hello, and welcome to my website! I'm Derek Gale, photography trainer and Fine Art photographer based in Worcester.

    If you are looking to improve your photographic creativity, skills or knowledge, check out the Photography Training pages.

    For beautiful Fine Art images that showcase my personal vision take a look at the Fine Art Photography pages.

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It’s all about the light – again.

I have written previously about how important the direction of the light is in your photography.   Kodak’s advice in the early 20th century was to have the light coming over your shoulder.  That was all well and good in the days when film wasn’t very sensitive, but today we can do the exact opposite, and it brings your images to life.

Shooting towards the light, known as “contre jour”, can bring out translucency and transparency, and add a “rim highlight” to your subjects.  This passion flower leaf and fruit shows translucency on the leaf, and a rim highlight on the fruit.  I held the stalk in one hand, making sure the leaf and fruit were in the sun, and held the camera up to my eye with the other.  The background is a hedge in shadow, which has come out very dark.  It’s a useful technique for separating the subject from the background.

This dandelion flower has some light from the front, but the real interest is added by the out of focus highlights in the background where light is reflecting off a stream.  The spider is a happy bonus, as I did not see it when I took the picture!  I was holding the camera quite a way away from me and using the screen on the back.  It was too bright for me to see details and there were reflections off the camera’s screen.

Here the late afternoon sun is shining through some plants outside the window behind the bowl and making a dappled pattern on the table.  The bowl has a literal rim highlight, and there was enough reflected light to lift the colour inside the bowl.   I placed the bowl as close to the corner as I could to give the longest light line across the frame.

It’s always worth looking hard at where the light is coming from and using it to your best advantage.

Little things mean a lot

In our new garden in Worcester we are still learning about what plants and wildlife we have.  Putting to one side the squirrels that drop bits of part-chewed walnuts (and squirrel spit!) all over our cars on the drive, there are some interesting insects around, like this Bronze Shield Bug.

Some of you will know about Levon Biss’ fantastic “Microsculpture” exhibition where the utter beauty of insects was spectacularly displayed via huge prints.  I don’t have access to the kit he used, but I do have a macro lens, some extension tubes and a camera that does in-camera focus stacking.  This straight down shot, where I am parallel to the main body of the insect to help with depth of field, captures the textures of the carapace etc, but it’s a bit disguised against the wood of the garden table.

I went and got some black perspex to try and get a more neutral background.  The perspex still had its protective film on which was reflecting the sky.  It was a bit of a gloomy day, so I also had brought out my 64-LED light panel to help give me a shorter shutter speed.  The light reflected off the protective film giving me a white background.  The insect now stands out much more, despite the complication added by the shadows.

On another morning I spotted a pigeon feather that had been caught in a cobweb on a garden chair.  I moved the chair so that the morning sunlight shone through the feather, and so that the background was dark to give good contrast.  The strength of the cobweb, given its delicacy, is amazing, and the structure of the feather is likewise.

Just a couple of small things, but the beauty can be captured with a macro lens and a bit of light.

Light, dark, and a touch of red

I’ve touched on patterns in previous posts.  They can be natural or can be man-made.  This post is about the man-made ones.

On a wander with a friend this week we passed some huge pylons carrying cables across the River Severn.  It was possible to get directly underneath them, and the focal length of my mobile’s camera, (35 mm equivalent), was just right to get the amount of perspective I wanted.  I cropped the image square and converted it to high contrast black and white.  That took away a bit of sky detail that was distracting.  Because I wasn’t absolutely under the centre it has a slightly disconcerting pattern.

The pylon image is mostly white with black lines; here’s the opposite in terms of tones.  The lock gates at Diglis Lock on the River Severn were just open, letting a slit of light through.  The slit and its reflection made an interesting transition. I used a 300mm equivalent lens to get the composition I wanted, and made sure the line was properly centered.  It was OK but worked better inverted.  Inverted the line and reflected line look like smoke from a chimney rather than water.

In these days of texting and email and suchlike it’s still gratifying to see a pile of letters ready to post.  Selecting just the very edges of the letters to be in focus gave a nice pattern repeat, and the red tint from the stamp reflections added an extra pattern.  I’d say it was a First Class image.  Did you see what I did there?

Keep your eyes open. Patterns on a large or a small scale, are everywhere.

 

Blimey, time flies!

I must apologise to my reader (readers?) for the huge gap between this blog post and my last blog post.  My only excuse is that the house move and associated stuff did take rather longer than expected.  Anyway, I’m here in Worcester now and photographically it’s looking very promising indeed.

“Red sky at night, photographer’s delight”?  Not all the time perhaps, but here behind the River Severn at Diglis it certainly was a fab sunset.  The fish rising added a bit of extra shape to the foreground, which was very handy.

Worcester has a lot of very interesting buildings, ranging from Medieval to brand spanking new.   This is the boathouse for the King’s School Boat Club.  It was opened in 2012 and is in the shape of a boat.  The shapes and contrast worked best in  black and white.

Finally a portrait.  There’s an elephant sculpture art trail on in Worcester at present.  It’s to raise money for a local hospice.  Each elephant has been painted by a different artist of group.  This one had a fabulously green face and the eye looks a bit scary!

So, a great start to my Worcester journey.  I’m looking forward to the future.

We’re in the process of selling our house and moving to Worcester.   Until that’s finally sorted I’ve removed my phone number from the website.

To get in touch please use the Contact Me page or email info(at)galephotography.co.uk

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Looking forward to hearing from you.