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  • Welcome to Gale Photography

    Hello, and welcome to my website! I'm Derek Gale, photography trainer and Fine Art photographer.

    If you are looking to improve your photographic creativity, skills or knowledge, check out the Photography Training pages.

    For beautiful Fine Art images that showcase my personal vision take a look at the Fine Art Photography pages.

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Fine Art in the simplest things.

What’s the perfect subject for a Fine Art photograph?  Well, to me it can be anything and everything. 

"Macro feather" by Derek Gale

 Take this image for example.  I was walking along and saw a feather on the ground.  I picked it up, held it between me and the sun, and using a 50mm macro lens took a close up shot.  It works because the pattern of light and shade is interesting, and because it’s not entirely clear that you’re looking at a feather. Some people have thought it was a ploughed field. 

"Car cobweb" by Derek Gale

 This is a cobweb.  It was built by an enterprising spider between my car door and my door mirror.  Once again I used a macro lens and was able to throw the background, of water droplets on my door mirror, out of focus. I like the contrast between light and dark, and also the contrast of the carefully made radial lines and more random concentric lines. 

Water light patterns" by Derek Gale

 Sometimes it’s a simple thing like the sun playing on water that makes a great Fine Art image.  This pattern of lines, a bit like those on an oscilloscope, were on the sandy bed of a small stream near the sea.  The sun shining through the irregular water surface was getting refracted which gave the pattern.  It was changing all the time, and you could take a hundred images and get a different one each time.  It was great for creative photography

"Oily water" by Derek Gale

 This image uses the reflectivity of a water surface rather than its transparency.  It’s of the oily water in the Venice Lagoon, and shows how pollution can produce great images.  I shot it from a vaporetto whilst everyone else was looking at the fabulous buildings.  Again the changing water surface made every image different. The conversion to black and white made it simpler. 

"Wide Enigma" by Derek Gale

 This final image is an enigma.  I don’t ever explain what it is, but let people use their imagination and come with their own ideas.  It’s often thought to have been taken, “under the sea, with lots of red seaweed”, but also has been described as, “looking across a river valley to a forest”.  It’s neither, and really shows just how complex an image can be made from a simple activity/thing. 

So there you have it; a feather, a cobweb, a stream, polluted water – and a mystery.  You don’t need to find exotic subjects for Fine Art images, just look around you. 

Remember, we’re at Coleshill Open Day and Food Festival on Sep 11th.  We’re part of the Arts and Crafts displays in The Granary.  Do come and have a chat about portrait photography and photography training

Cheers, 

Derek.

It’s all up in the air.

You may have noticed that I’m interested in cars.  Well, I’m also interested in aircraft as well, and they are great things to photograph creatively, both in the air and on the ground.

"Swiss Hunter" by Derek Gale

This privately owned Hawker Hunter of “Fliegerstaffel 15” was at an airshow at Kemble in the Cotswolds.  I used a long lens (ca. 600mm equivalent) to get the aircraft nice and large in the frame, and panned as it flew past.  I was lucky with the shape of the clouds in the background, as they formed an arrow going from right to left. 

"Red Arrows 5" by Derek Gale

On the subject of arrows, here’s a shot of the Hawks of the RAF’s famous Red Arrows aerobatic display team.  Their precision flying is a joy, and this near head-on shot of all nine aircraft has a good diagonal shape to it, from top left to bottom right.  The red aircraft contrast well with the blue sky. 

"Red Arrows 6" by Derek Gale

Did I mention precision?  Here’s a perfect example of just how good they are.  The aircraft are perfectly placed relative to each other, and look like they’ve been cloned there – they haven’t!  Once again I’ve used a long lens and panned as they flew past. 

"Miss Demeanour jet blur" by Derek Gale

As I said, aircraft on the ground also make good subjects.  This is another privately owned Hawker Hunter, “Miss Demeanour”.  It’s got a fabulous paint job, and I saw that another jet was running its engine in front of it.  The heat from the jet’s exhaust gave good “wobble” to the air, so the fuselage of the Hunter went all blurry.  The nose wheel was too low to be affected so it’s still sharp. 

"C-46 nose art" by Derek Gale

Long lenses can be useful to capture details of individual aircraft on the ground. I loved the very aggressive nose art on this 2nd World War Curtiss C-46 Commando transport plane at an air museum in the USA.  The lens has compressed the perspective, so it’s not clear any more that it’s an aircraft. 

"B-25 canopy" by Derek Gale

This image is a further extension of that  idea.  It’s a perspex canopy on a North American B-25 Mitchell bomber being used as a filming plane in the USA.  I  chose the right time of day, and made sure that the very bright sun was placed behind the canopy. It’s made for a strong, simple image with the outline highlit, and the scratches on the canopy adding interest. 

So, get out there and get some great images of aircraft!  There’s still lots airshows this year. 

Cheers, 

Derek. 

Come and meet us at Coleshill Food Festival and Open Day on September 11th.  We’re in The Granary as part of the Arts & Craft displays. 

Calling all Trekkies: the story continues…

Once again I’m pleased to report a successful Photo Trek at Buscot Park.  It was last weekend and we had a “full house”.  These photographic training events are great fun, and Buscot Park is a perfect venue for them.  The group was terrific, with a wide range of photographic experience, and equipment ranging from a digital compact camera, to a digital SLR and lots of lenses.  I assigned everyone their afternoon’s photographic projects, and we were off. 

"Buscot swirl" by Derek Gale

Once again, we started under the trees near the garden entrance.  The exercise we do here is great for breaking the ice.  It gets everyone off the “Fully Automatic” setting, and shows them the freedom that digital cameras give you.  The rapid camera movement I’ve used here made for a fabulous off-centre swirl.  

"Buscot garden entrance" by Derek Gale

It has to be said that the weather at this Buscot Park Photo Trek wasn’t as good as it has been previously.  The relatively bright sky made the exposure compensation exercise even more important.  With this image of the garden entrance I tried to get as little of the sky in the shot as possible.  Even though I did that, I had to use some positive Exposure Compensation to get the details right in the stonework.  

"Dramatic Buscot sky" by Derek Gale

Moving through to the walled garden, the sky was looking very threatening.  It was great for photography, as the light was changing all the time.  We had a really good discussion about exposure, and one delegate was dressed perfectly, in white and black, to demonstrate the fact that meters always want to turn things mid-grey. 

"Buscot Trekkies" by Derek Gale

The delegates loved the terracotta warriors.   The sun came out as we reached them and it gave a really good range of light angles on the faces of the warriors.  They are very easy to photograph; they don’t move and never get bored with modelling! 

"Dramatic Buscot House" by Derek Gale

The clouds got even more threatening as we reached the house itself.  The angling sunlight across the front of the house, with the dark rainclouds behind, made for a stunning image.  There was an almost machine gun sound of shutters firing, and then, as quickly as it had come out, the sun went in.  You must always take your photographic chances… 

…and then it rained.  Luckily it was nearly the end of the Trek, so we sheltered under a handy tree and looked at everyone’s project images.  There were some stunning shots, and everyone had produced something they were pleased with. 

"Rainy Buscot water garden" by Derek Gale

A quick look back down the famous water garden, and another Buscot Photo Trek was over.  It was our last Trek there for this year, but we hope to run some more next year, so keep checking our website for details, or sign up to our e-mail newsletter and we’ll keep you informed. 

Cheers, 

Derek 

www.galephotography.co.uk

I’m just a regular guy: Part 4.

It’s the “regular guy” thing again!  

As I’ve mentioned before, it’s a real privilege to photograph the same people over a period of time, especially kids.  You see how they’ve grown and changed, and the shoot is easier, because you’ve photographed them before.  

At a recent portrait shoot, two brothers and their respective families, came along.  I’d photographed the family of one of the brothers twice before.  With the other brother’s family it was the first time I’d met them. 

"Looking up 1" by Derek Gale

On their previous shoots I’d gone for a natural style, with diffused lighting, so to keep the  same look and feel as the previous images, I did the same for this shoot.  Here I’ve concentrated on the girl’s eyes, which were slightly accentuated by the angle I chose.  

"Looking up 2" by Derek Gale

This image of her brother uses a similar technique.  With this sort of image the conversion to black & white really helps simplify the image, and in each case I’ve used a long(ish) lens (80 mm equivalent) to throw the background out of focus. 

"Looking up 3" by Derek Gale

I didn’t need a black and white conversion here.  The boy’s skin tones were fantastic, and it would have lost too much of the colour contrast with his blond hair.  Again I’ve used a long(ish) lens to simplify the image.  He was great to photograph, with a really good “resting face”. 

"Looking left" by Derek Gale

Here you can see the difference between looking down on a subject and being at their eye level.  In this image I dropped down to his level, and to me he looks a bit older because of that.  It’s much more of a “moment observed”, as he seems unaware of the camera.  Once again the black and white conversion helps to make the image stronger. I didn’t need the colour contrast, and didn’t want the green foliage in the background to distract. 

"Looking right" by Derek Gale

His brother was really fun to work with.  He was asking “Why?” to everything, and was very lively.  He had a very expressive “active face”, and a great grin.  This image, of him looking off camera, caught his personality well. 

So, all in all it was a great shoot.  I look forward to the next one! 

Cheers, 

Derek 

www.galephotography.co.uk

The Car’s the Star!

You may have noticed from previous blog posts that I am a bit of a fan of cars.  I own a classic Pininfarina Spidereuropa.  It sounds glamorous, but it’s really just an old FIAT in a party dress.  

The shapes of cars are fascinating subjects for creative photography, and I love the little details. 

"Jaguar C-type bonnet" by Derek Gale

This is the bonnet of a Jaguar C-type Le Mans racing car from the 1950’s.  I was attracted to the louvres – cut into the bonnet to help engine cooling – and the way that the highlights in the background made a complementary pattern.  I used a long lens and a wide aperture to give great bokeh

"Le Mans Audi grime" by Derek Gale

Often, selecting just a part of a car can tell a story.  Take this image for example.  It’s part of the front/side bodywork of the modern Le Mans 24 Hour Race-winning Audi R8.  You can see just how effective the aerodynamics of the car were, because the oil from other cars has spread in perfect lines on the Audi’s curves.  Not really pretty, but it tells us so much more about the car than completely clean bodywork. 

"Maserati Birdcage reflection" by Derek Gale

This car, the Maserati Birdcage concept car, does have completely clean bodywork.  It’s very shiny, and reflecting the chequered flag pattern of the marquee the car was under.  It’s made a great pattern/abstract shot, which also reflects the fabulous racing history of the original Maserati Birdcage. 

"Mercedes star" by Derek Gale

Bonnet/radiator badges on cars are a perfect example of branding.  This 1930’s Mercedes badge really sums up everything about the car; quality engineering, style without (too much) ostentation, and exclusiveness.  I don’t need to show the rest of the car.  You get enough of an idea of how it is from the out of focus bonnet hinges, and the split windscreen in the background. 

"American car tail light" by Derek Gale

This car did have style with a lot of ostentation.  It’s a 1950’s Cadillac, and was made in the era where cars looked a lot like jet fighters or rockets.  These tail lights have it all; lots of chrome, space-age design, and they are “loud and proud”.  I used a long telephoto lens to throw the second light in the background out of focus.  This lets us concentrate on the foreground light. 

"Bentley Mk VI bonnet" by Derek Gale

Lest we forget, cars are made for driving, and not just for admiring their design.  This image is of my view from the passenger seat of a friend’s early 1950’s Bentley Mark VI Park Ward convertible.  It shows an empty open road, the sheen of the coachbuilt bonnet reflecting the sky, and the proud Bentley “Flying B” pointing the way. You can follow the line of the bonnet, and that of the road, to that magical place called “just around the corner”, that makes you want to keep on driving. 

Cars and photography; the perfect partners. 

Cheers, 

Derek 

www.galephotography.co.uk