Where is the light coming from?

Yesterday afternoon, as it was a lovely day, I went for a walk round a local country park.  I took my Panasonic TZ-100 travel-zoom compact camera, as it’s small and light.

The sun was quite low in the sky and it was reflecting well off the large lake at the park.  How that light looked was very dependent on what side of the lake you were.  The first side I came to had the sun almost opposite, which meant backlighting.

The park’s swans were quite photogenic in that light.  This swan was feeding with its head under the water.  I waited until it lifted its head up again, which gave the droplets falling from its beak, the ripple rings and the catch light near the edge of the frame.

As the birds swam around, the ripples they made gave lots of little pinpoints of lights.  It looked as if they were being followed by diamonds.  I was lucky here as the bird’s beak was wet, so had a nice edge light on it.  The low exposure level of both these images gives an almost monochrome look to them.

Moving to the other side of the lake meant that the light was coming from behind me.  No longer were the images monochrome; they had deep colours and saturation.  The absence of significant wind gave high quality reflections.  Here are some reflected reeds with gentle ripples caused by a passing duck!

The broader reflections were good too, with distorted trees and almost perfectly rendered sky.  I’ve inverted the image to make it less obviously a reflection.

Photography is all about the light, and here you can see just how much your images can change when you change the light direction.  It’s an important lesson.

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