It’s in the frame.

In the “old days” we were always told to use some sort of frame in the foreground of our images to “hold in the edges”.  Whilst some advice from then is no longer so useful, such as always having the sun over your shoulder when taking  a portrait, the use of frames is still valid.

Windows have frames, and you can use them to frame your images.  You then need to decide whether to be inside looking out, or outside looking in.  Take a look at these  slightly unconventional portraits…

"Framed portrait looking out"

“Framed portrait looking out”

Here I’m inside a garden shed, with very cobwebby/dusty glass.  The dirty glass softens the view out, reduces the contrast, and makes the portrait a bit mysterious.  The green jacket and lots of greenery in the background have lent a green tone to the skin in the shadow areas.

"Framed portrait looking in"

“Framed portrait looking in”

Here I’m outside looking in.  The scale of the face relative to the window is quite different to the previous image.  The face is giving scale to the, glassless, window rather than the other way round.  Again were aren’t looking at a pristine building, so there’s a story of change and decay here somewhere.

Frames?  Very useful, although how you might frame a print of these images gets interesting!

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