Handles sanitized frequently!

Cameras aren’t just for taking pictures of your family & friends or of “big views”, they’re fabulously useful as visual notebooks to help carry out sociological research, and to do research into the changing use of language.  On a recent trip to Canada I was “sign spotting”, because the signs people use tell us a lot about them.

"But why?" by Derek Gale

Here’s an example from Niagara Falls. It was at the entrance to the main Visitor Centre, and I was bemused as to why they were doing it, and why they needed to tell everyone that they were doing it.  The irony is that most people I saw ( and me) didn’t use the handles to open the door!

"But why were there 2 spaces?" by Derek Gale

Here’s an example with one of my pet hates, a badly used apostrophe.  The car parking space at the Royal Bank of Canada was for “seniors” but the sign implied that there was only one senior that might use it.   There was however another “senior’s” space, so the senior in question must have had more than one car!

"Financial crisis" by Derek Gale

This sign was on the edge of Lake Huron, and it had no errors.  I did think that I should bring it back to the UK as a reminder to everyone about the risks some financial institutions took a few years ago.

"Perfectly named" by Derek Gale

This sign was on the door of a medical centre in the Canadian city of Guelph.  With a name like that what other career was open to him (or her!)?  It reminded me of the dentist called Mr Pullar who used to have a practice in Maidenhead, UK.

"Allergy-free food" by Derek Gale

Here’s another nice apostrophe; the famous possessive plural.  I liked the reason that the restaurant gave to stop you bringing your own food in.  It’s a good example of “control by fear”.  After all, what reasonable person would want to risk the health of other diners?  It also implies that all of the food in the restaurant is free from any component that might cause an allergic reaction.  The menu looked pretty normal to me though… … including nuts.

"Welcome home" by Derek Gale

So, after an overnight flight back to the UK from Canada we had to catch the Hotel Hoppa back to our car.  Here’s the sign on the ticket machine in the Hoppa waiting Room.  It did look as if it had been there a while.  Clearly someone didn’t completely believe it, and had torn it, presumably to access the money slot. 

As you can see, there are loads of interesting signs around if you look, and there might even be a book about them waiting to be published.

Cheers,

Derek.                   www.galephotography.co.uk

PS   I wasn’t able to photograph a memorable sign I saw at a National Trust tea room in the UK.  It said, “Child soup & roll £1.75”.  A modern take on Jonathan Swift’s “A modest proposal”?

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