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  • Welcome to Gale Photography

    Hello! I'm Derek Gale, Fine Art photographer and photography trainer.

    I make beautiful Fine Art images that showcase my personal vision. I also love passing on my photographic ideas and knowledge, so if you want to improve your photographic creativity and technical skill do get in touch.

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No sun, no flash? No worries!

The sun has set and you’ve left your external flash at home.  You could use the room’s artificial light or your camera’s built-in flash, but with no control over light direction your images may not be that interesting.

There’s a laptop available, a red LED bicycle rear lamp, and a 5-LED white torch.  What can you do with those light sources?

"18th Century house; 21st Century life"

“18th Century house; 21st Century life”

You could use the light from the laptop’s screen as a light for a portrait that balances the subject’s 18th Century house and their 21st Century life.  The directional light from the laptop screen illuminates the corner of the room, and the person, whilst leaving the rest of the room dark.  It’s almost like a candle’s light.

"Bicycle rear LED light"

“Bicycle rear LED light”

That brings us to the LED bicycle rear light.  The points of light from the LEDs are broken up by the light’s lens into a partly square shape.  Using a tripod to make sure the camera is steady, and asking asking the person to move it in a star shape whilst the shutter is open, results in this image.  The 13 second exposure allows for a few star shape cycles to give more interest.

"5-LED torch swirl"

“5-LED torch swirl”

Finally we’ve got to the 5-LED torch.  The LEDs are in a line and quite distinct.  Using a long exposure again, and making sure the swirly is more random than the bike light, gives an interesting pattern.  Copying it and mirroring it in Photoshop gives symmetry.

No sun, no flash? No worries!  Just use whatever lights you can find!!

Watch the birdy!

That’s the phrase that photographers used in the past to get their subject’s attention.  But what do you do to get the attention of a bird?  Well, I use a soft clicking noise!  It doesn’t always work, and other people sometimes look at me a bit sideways, but if I get better images as a result I don’t mind that.

I was at a local Fete recently and there was a falconry display.  After the display the falconer put his birds into a rather dark tent.  Using a long (300mm) lens I was able to get some bird portraits with the, not very bright, available light, and with different backgrounds.

"Short-eared owl portrait"

“Short-eared owl portrait”

I had to wait for quite a while to get this short-eared owl to look at me, but the wonderful expression, and fabulous eyelashes (!), made it worthwhile.  I’ve lightened the face shield, and vignetted the corners, to make the face stand out.  The background was in shadow so it’s rendered as almost black, allowing us to concentrate on the face and the feather texture.

"A buzzard called Leyton"

“A buzzard called Leighton”

This buzzard, rather wonderfully named “Leyton”, was in moult, and the loose feather on his head made for a slightly comical look.  You can see how different his face shape is compared to the owl.  Buzzards use binocular vision to hunt, whereas owls use sound.  The background here is the white wall of the tent.  Once again I’ve vignetted the corners to concentrate on the bird.

"Barn owl portrait"

“Barn owl portrait”

Finally there’s a portrait of a beautiful barn owl (tyto alba).  It was on the falconer’s gloved hand with the Fete’s field in the background.  The mottled green of the background goes well with the brown/cream tones of the bird’s feathers.  The heart-shaped face shield of the bird catches sounds and focuses them towards the asymmetrically-placed ears, giving fantastic hearing.

Three different birds, and three different backgrounds.  I probably moved no more than 6 feet to change the background from white to black to green.

It’s long, but it’s not wobbly!

I try not to blog about equipment, but here’s a post about… equipment!

I’m using my micro 4/3rds camera a lot these days.  It’s light, small, and has excellent image quality.  I’ve got three prime lenses; a 14 mm wide-angle, a 20 mm f1.7, and a 60 mm portrait lens.  With micro 4/3rds lenses the declared focal length needs to be multiplied by 2 to give the effective focal length.  The 14mm is therefore a 28 mm and so on.

I have been feeling the lack of a longer reach lens.  Although I have an adapter to fit my Nikon telephoto lenses they are only manual focus, so I decided to buy a native micro 4/3rds lens.  After doing quite a bit research I recently bought a Lumix 45-150 mm lens.  It’s the equivalent of a 90 mm to 300 mm lens, so has reasonable reach.  Mostly importantly it has image stabilisation (IS), which reduces camera shake.  My Panasonic camera body does not have IS built in.

"Cosmos flower"

“Cosmos flower”

The lens has a modest maximum aperture of f5.6 at its longest focal length of 150 mm, but, with a reasonable separation between the subject and the background, you can get a nicely blurred background.  As shown with this image of a cosmos flower in the garden

"Japanese maple"

“Japanese maple”

It’s a pretty sharp lens, and there’s plenty of detail in this shot of our Japanese maple (Acer palmatum dissectum “Red Dragon”).  I’ve added the vignnette! Even shooting on a dull day at around 1/60th of a second there’s no camera shake due to the IS system’s assistance.  Normally I would try and shoot at the reciprocal of the focal length; in this case at least 1/150 of a second.

"Abstract water"

“Abstract water”

The longer reach allowed me to get this image.  I was on a bridge over the Kennet and Avon Canal near Newbury and saw the wonderful reflections of the clouds and sun in the water.  Without the new lens I would have been too far away.  The movement of the water has produced some beautiful patterns.

I’m looking forward to shooting some portraits with the lens, so look out for another post.

“Wot we did on our holidaze”

So, you’ve packed your suitcase, beach towel, sun cream, money and passport.  What do you do next to ensure a trouble-free holiday as far as photography is concerned?  Here are some things to do before you leave home, and some to do when you are on holiday.

"Windsurfer @ Kimmeridge"

“Windsurfer @ Kimmeridge”

Before you leave home:

Firstly, charge your all camera batteries. If you don’t have spare battery now’s the time to buy one (or two!).

Move all your older images from your memory cards to your computer, and then use “Format” to delete all the older images and make the card ready for new images.  If you don’t know how to do this take a look at your manual.  It’s often in the “Setup” menu.

Using an indelible marker write your surname and postcode (+ UK) on your memory cards.  It improves your chances of getting a lost memory card back.

Buy some spare memory cards, (they are very cheap these days), and a separate case to safely store them away from your camera bag.  I use a little Lowepro memory card case which fits on my trouser belt.

If you are going away for a while, pack a battery charger.

"Rock pool patterns"

“Rock pool patterns”

And while you are away:

Keep your camera out of sight until you need it.  I’ve seen folks wandering through tourist areas with very expensive Leicas round their necks.  Don’t be a target!

Do the same when you are on the beach.  Keep your camera out of sight, and out of the way of potentially damaging sea spray or sand.  Salty water and sand are not good company for lenses and sensitive electronics. If you have used sun screen, wipe your hands before you use the camera, as sun screen can attract sand.  A plastic bag to put the camera in is a good idea – but don’t leave it in direct sun!

Leave any full memory cards in your hotel room safe or hotel main safe.  If you are touring around then keep them on you in the little belt case.   A camera can be replaced, but the images on your cards can’t.

If you will be away for quite a while, consider uploading your images to a cloud-based service, such as Dropbox or Picasa, as you go.

"The big wave!"

“The big wave!”

Follow these guidelines and you should come back with great memories and a working camera.

Happy holiday!!

It’s in the frame.

In the “old days” we were always told to use some sort of frame in the foreground of our images to “hold in the edges”.  Whilst some advice from then is no longer so useful, such as always having the sun over your shoulder when taking  a portrait, the use of frames is still valid.

Windows have frames, and you can use them to frame your images.  You then need to decide whether to be inside looking out, or outside looking in.  Take a look at these  slightly unconventional portraits…

"Framed portrait looking out"

“Framed portrait looking out”

Here I’m inside a garden shed, with very cobwebby/dusty glass.  The dirty glass softens the view out, reduces the contrast, and makes the portrait a bit mysterious.  The green jacket and lots of greenery in the background have lent a green tone to the skin in the shadow areas.

"Framed portrait looking in"

“Framed portrait looking in”

Here I’m outside looking in.  The scale of the face relative to the window is quite different to the previous image.  The face is giving scale to the, glassless, window rather than the other way round.  Again were aren’t looking at a pristine building, so there’s a story of change and decay here somewhere.

Frames?  Very useful, although how you might frame a print of these images gets interesting!